Catalog

Search our Catalog

Lunch & a Book

The library's lunchtime book discussion group started in September 1998. Books include works of fiction and nonfiction, classics and contemporary novels. We meet on the second Thursday of the month from Noon to 1:00 PM. The December meeting is used to share favorite titles and make suggestions for the coming year.

Lunch and a Book 2016 Reading List

Lunch and a Book meets the second Thursday of the month from 12:00-1:00PM.  No registration required, participation encouraged.

All the light we cannot see: a novel by Anthony Doerr — January 14


The girl on the train by Paula Hawkins — February 11


The invention of wings: a novel by Sue Monk Kidd — March 10


Shanghai girls: a novel by Lisa See — April 14


Sidney Chambers and the shadow of death by James Runcie — May 12

Lunch and a Book January 2016

All the light we cannot see: a novel by Anthony Doerr — When Marie Laure is six, she goes blind, and her father builds her a model of their neighborhood, so she can memorize it with her fingers and navigate the real streets. When the Germans occupy Paris, father and daughter flee to Saint-Malo on the Brittany coast. In Germany, an orphan boy, Werner, grows up with his younger sister, Jutta, both enchanted by a crude radio Werner finds. He becomes a master at building and fixing radios, a talent that wins him a place at an elite and brutal military academy and, ultimately, makes him a highly specialized tracker of the Resistance. Werner travels through the heart of Hitler Youth to the far-flung outskirts of Russia, and finally into Saint-Malo, where his path converges with Marie-Laure.

Lunch and a Book November 2015

Station eleven by Emily St. John Mandel — Set in the eerie days of civilization's collapse, Station Eleven tells the story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior, and a nomadic group of actors roaming the scattered outposts of the Great Lakes region, risking everything for art and humanity. Together, this small troupe moves between the settlements of an altered world, performing Shakespeare and music for scattered communities of survivors. Written on their caravan, is a line from Star Trek: "Because survival is insufficient." Join us on Thursday November 12 at noon.

Lunch and a Book October 2015

Daytripper by Fábio Moon & Gabriel Bá — This graphic novel follows the life of one man, Bras de Olivias Dominguez. Every chapter features an important period in his life in Brazil, and each story ends the same way: with his death. In every chapter, Bras dies at different moments in his life, as the story follows him through his entire existence; one filled with possibilities of happiness and sorrow, good and bad, love and loneliness. A story about living life to its fullest, because any of us can die at any moment.  Join us on Thursday, October 8 at noon.

Lunch and a Book September 2015

Us by David Nicholls — After almost 30 years of marriage, Connie tells Douglas that she thinks she wants a divorce. But she can't bring herself to cancel their month-long tour of European capitals experiencing the world's greatest works of art with their son Albie. Douglas is privately convinced that this trip will rekindle the romance in the marriage, and may even help him to bond with Albie. Us is the story of a man trying to rescue his relationship with the woman he loves and learning how to get closer to a son who's always felt like a stranger. Join us Thursday, September 10 at noon.

Great Michigan Read 2015-2016


Canton Public Library in partnership with the Michigan Humanities Council is pleased to announce the 2015-2016 Great Michigan Read: STATION ELEVEN by Emily St. John Mandel.  The Great Michigan Read is presented by the Michigan Humanities Council with support from Meijer, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and a host of other sponsors. 
 

Station eleven by Emily St. John Mandel — Station Eleven is the story of the Traveling Symphony, a troupe of Shakespearean actors and orchestral musicians traveling the shores of the Great Lakes in a post-apocalyptic Michigan. Striving to maintain their humanity in the altered landscape of a world where 99% of the population has been wiped out by a flu pandemic, the Traveling Symphony operates under one credo: “Survival is insufficient.”

Lunch and a Book August 2015

Euphoria: a novel by Lily King — English anthropologist Andrew Bankson has been alone in the field for several years, studying the Kiona river tribe of New Guinea. Haunted by his brothers' deaths and frustrated and isolated by his research, Bankson is on the verge of suicide when a chance encounter with colleagues, the controversial Nell Stone and her mercurial Australian husband Fen, pulls him back from the brink. Nell and Fen have just fled the bloodthirsty Mumbanyo and, in spite of Nell's poor health, are hungry for a new discovery. When Bankson finds them a new tribe nearby--the artistic, female-dominated Tam--he ignites an intellectual and romantic firestorm between the three of them that burns out of anyone's control. Join us Thursday, August 13 at noon.

Lunch and a Book July 2015

Shelter: a novel by Frances Greenslade — For sisters Maggie and Jenny growing up in the Pacific mountains in the early 1970s, life felt nearly perfect. But, not long after Maggie's tenth birthday, their father is killed in a logging accident. A few months later, their mother drops them at a neighbor's house, promising to return. She never does. Even as they struggle to understand how their mother could abandon them, they hope that she is fighting her way back to the daughters who adore her and who need her so desperately. Join us Thursday, July 9 at noon.

Lunch and a Book - June

The fault in our stars by John Green — Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel's story is about to be completely rewritten. The Fault in Our Stars brilliantly explores the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love. Join us Thursday, June 11 at noon.

Lunch and a Book May 2015

The all-girl filling station's last reunion: a novel by Fannie Flagg — Spanning decades, generations, and America in the 1940s and today, The All-Girl Filling Station's Last Reunion is a fun-loving mystery about an Alabama woman today, and five women who in 1943 worked in a Phillips 66 gas station, during the WWII years. Like Fannie Flagg's classic Fried Green Tomatoes, this is filled to the brim with Flagg's trademark funny voice and storytelling magic. Join us Thursday May 14 at noon.

Lunch and a Book April 2015

Join us Thursday, April 9 at noon as we discuss:

The end of night: searching for natural darkness in an age of artificial light by Paul Bogard — A deeply panoramic tour of the night, from its brightest spots to the darkest skies we have left. A starry night is one of nature's most magical wonders. Yet in our artificially lit world, most of us no longer experience true darkness. Paul Bogard restores our awareness of the spectacularly primal, wildly dark night sky and how it has influenced the human experience across everything from science to art.

Lunch and a Book March 2015

Join us Thursday, March 12 at noon as we discuss:

Orphan train by Christina Baker Kline — Between 1854 and 1929, orphan trains carried thousands of abandoned children from the cities of the East Coast to the farmlands of the Midwest. Vivian Daly was one such child, sent from New York City to an uncertain future a world away. Returning east later in life, Vivian leads a quiet existence on the coast of Maine. But hidden in her attic are vestiges of a turbulent past. Seventeen-year-old Molly Ayer knows that a community-service position helping an elderly widow clean out her attic is the only thing keeping her out of juvenile hall. But as Molly helps Vivian sort through her keepsakes, she discovers that she and Vivian aren't as different as they appear.

Lunch and a Book February 2015

Join us Thursday, February 12 at noon as we discuss:

The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith — Like a hero in a latter-day Henry James novel, Tom Ripley is sent to Italy with a commission to coax a prodigal young American back to his wealthy father. But Ripley finds himself so fond of Dickie Greenleaf that he wants to be like him--exactly like him.  Suave, agreeable, and utterly amoral, Ripley stops at nothing--certainly not only one murder--to accomplish his goal.  Turning the mystery form inside out, Highsmith shows the terrifying abilities afforded to a man unhindered by the concept of evil.

Lunch and a Book 2015 Reading List

Lunch and a Book meets the second Thursday of the month from 12:00-1:00PM.  No registration required, participation encouraged.

Bootstrapper: from broke to badass on a northern Michigan farm by Mardi Jo Link — January 8



The talented Mr. Ripley
by Patricia Highsmith — February 12




Orphan train by Christina Baker Kline — March 12


The end of night: searching for natural darkness in an age of artificial light by Paul Bogard — April 9


The all-girl filling station's last reunion: a novel by Fannie Flagg — May 14

Lunch and a Book January 2015

Join us Thursday, January 8 at noon as we discuss:

Bootstrapper: from broke to badass on a northern Michigan farm by Mardi Jo Link — It's the summer of 2005, and Mardi Jo Link's dream of living the simple life has unraveled into debt and heartbreak. She and her husband of nineteen years have just called it quits, leaving her with serious cash-flow problems and a looming divorce. Link makes a seemingly impossible resolution: to hang on to her century-old farmhouse in northern Michigan and continue to raise her three boys on well water and wood chopping and dirt. Armed with an unfailing sense of humor and three resolute accomplices, Link confronts blizzards and foxes, learns about Zen divorce and the best way to butcher a hog, dominates a zucchini-growing contest and wins a year's supply of local bread, masters the art of bargain cooking, wrangles rampaging poultry, and withstands any blow to her pride in order to preserve the life she wants.

Lunch and a Book November 2014

Join us on Thursday, November 13 at noon as we discuss:

The Rosie project by Graeme Simsion — Don Tillman, a brilliant yet socially challenged professor of genetics, designs the Wife Project: a sixteen-page survey to find his perfect partner. Don quickly disqualifies Rosie Jarman as a candidate, but agrees help Rosie on her own quest: identifying her biological father. When an unlikely relationship develops as they collaborate on the Father Project, Don is forced to confront the spontaneous whirlwind that is Rosie-and the realization that, despite your best scientific efforts, you don't find love, it finds you.

Lunch and a Book October 2014

Join us on Thursday, October 9 at noon as we discuss:

The antidote: happiness for people who can't stand positive thinking by Oliver Burkeman — Burkeman introduces us to a group of people who share a surprising way of thinking about life. Whether experimental psychologists, terrorism experts, Buddhists, hardheaded business consultants, Greek philosophers, or modern-day gurus, they argue that it's our constant effort to be happy that is making us miserable. Their alternative path to happiness and success involves embracing failure, pessimism, and uncertainty--the very things we spend our lives trying to avoid.

Lunch and a Book September 2014

On Thursday, September 11 at noon, we will be discussing:

1984: a novel by George Orwell ; with an afterword by Erich Fromm — Written in 1948, George Orwell's classic novel created a chilling future where Big Brother and the Thought Police monitored every move. And while the year 1984 has come and gone, Orwell's haunting vision of the world remains timeless.

For more insight on this work, take a look at these interviews with Cory Doctorow or Christopher Hitchens.

Lunch & a Book June 2014

On Thursday, June 12 at noon, we will be discussing:

The housekeeper and the professor by Yoko Ogawa ; translated by Stephen Snyder — A beautiful story about family, memory, and math. Yes, math. Ever since a traumatic head injury, a brilliant math professor has had only eighty minutes of short-term memory.  The housekeeper hired to care for the Professor returns to her job every morning to find that the Professor has forgotten her. Though he cannot create new memories, the Professor's mind is alive with elegant equations from his past. And the numbers, in all of their articulate order, reveal a new and poetic world to both the Housekeeper and her young son.

Lunch & a Book July 2014

On Thursday, July 10 at noon, we will be discussing:

Mr. Penumbra's 24-hour bookstore by Robin Sloan — A gleeful tale of global conspiracy, complex code-breaking, high-tech data visualization, young love, rollicking adventure, and the secret to eternal life--mostly set in a hole-in-the-wall San Francisco bookstore. The Great Recession has shuffled Clay Jannon out of his job as a Web-design drone--and serendipity, sheer curiosity, and the ability to climb a ladder like a monkey has landed him a new gig working the night shift at Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore. But after just a few days on the job, Clay begins to realize that this store is even more curious than the name suggests.