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Picture Book

Picture Books on Bundling Up

The temperatures outside have dropped, so it's time to get out our warm winter clothing. Think coats, sweaters, hats, mittens, and boots. Keep cozy by reading these picture books about bundling up.


Lucille's snowsuit by Kathryn Lasky ; illustrated by Marylin Hafner


The jacket I wear in the snow by Shirley Neitzel ; pictures by Nancy Winslow Parker


Little lamb, have you any wool? by Isabel Minhós Martins ; [illustrations by] Yara Kono


Under my hood I have a hat by Karla Kuskin ; illustrations by Fumi Kosaka


The hat by Jan Brett

Curl Up With a Cold-Weather Picture Book

The season is changing once again and it's time to get cozy under a blanket with a wintry book. Try these snowy weather-themed picture books and stay warm!

Snowy Sunday by Phyllis Root ; illustrated by Helen Craig


First snow by Peter McCarty


Snow by Sam Usher


The little snowplow by Lora Koehler ; illustrated by Jake Parker


If it's snowy and you know it, clap your paws! by Kim Norman ; illustrated by Liza Woodruff


Outside by Deirdre Gill

Books For Babies - Black and White

Do babies really like looking at black-and-white images? Yes! High-contrast images are great for visual stimulation. Try some of these titles to stimulate your baby's visual development.


I like black and white by Barbara Jean Hicks ; illustrated by Lila Prap


White on black by Tana Hoban


Black on white by Tana Hoban


What is that? by Tana Hoban

Books For Babies - Faces

Babies love looking at faces! In fact, they are hardwired to recognize faces, helping them to connect with their caregivers early on. Want to give your little one some more faces to gaze at? Here are some great titles he or she will love.

Baby faces by Margaret Miller


What's on my head? by Margaret Miller



Mrs. Mustard's baby faces by Jane Wattenberg



Baby! Baby! by Vicky Ceelen

Wordless Picture Books

Have you ever been drawn to a wordless picture book, but been unsure how to share it with your child? Check out these helpful tips, and remember that wordless picture books can be a great tool to enhance your child's literacy, whether or not he or she knows how to read.

These picture books don't need words to tell their story:

Flotsam by David Wiesner

Flashlight by Lizi Boyd

Good dog, Carl by Alexandra Day

Wave by Suzy Lee

Tuesday by David Wiesner

Savvy Seniors: June 2015

Reading time for kids can be fun when it's with an older adult. Hit the library with your grandchild, or a "grand friend," to track down some classics.

Round trip by Ann Jonas

Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren ; translated from the Swedish by Florence Lamborn ; illustrated by Louis S. Glanzman

Frog and Toad storybook treasury by Arnold Lobel

Sleuth a Story: Wordless Picture Books

Sometimes it's nice to travel back to your childhood. Whether you "read" these books with a child or simple explore them for yourself, use the pictures in these wordless books as clues to decipher the stories.

Tuesday by David Wiesner

Pool by JiHyeon Lee

BirdCatDog: a graphic novel by Lee Nordling & Meritxell Bosch


Flora and the flamingo by Molly Idle

Flora and the penguin by Molly Idle

Draw! by Raúl Colón

Imagination and Innovation in Picture Books

It's only Stanley by Jon Agee —  Very strange noises that keep awakening the Wimbledon family one night have an even stranger source.


Rosie Revere, engineer by Andrea Beaty ; illustrated by David Roberts —  A young aspiring engineer must first conquer her fear of failure.


Journey by Aaron Becker —  Using a red marker, a young girl draws a door on her bedroom wall and through it enters another world where she experiences many adventures, including being captured by an evil emperor.

Scary and Spooky Stories

Kindergarten

The gruffalo by Julia Donaldson ; pictures by Axel Scheffler

The dark by Lemony Snicket ; illustrated by Jon Klassen

Black dog by Levi Pinfold

The monster at the end of this book by written by Jon Stone ; illustrated by Mike Smollin ; featuring Jim Henson's Sesame Street muppets

First Grade

Fog Island by Tomi Ungerer

Plants vs. zombies: save your brains! by Catherine Hapka

Picture Books for Women's History Month

March is Women's History Month. To celebrate, try one of these great picture books with positive stories featuring strong female characters. 

Dancing in the wings by Debbie Allen ; pictures by Kadir Nelson
Sassy tries out for a summer dance festival in Washington, D.C., despite the other girls' taunts that she is much too tall.




The dot by Peter H. Reynolds
Vashti believes that she cannot draw, but her art teacher's encouragement leads her to change her mind.

Every Day is a Good Day to Read

March is National Reading Month, and we want to stress how important it is to read to your child everyday. If you read just 15 minutes a day during the first five years of a child's life, that's over 450 hours (or over 19 whole days!) of reading by their fifth birthday. There is a book for every day of the week, and we can prove it:

Monday is one day by Arthur A. Levine ; illustrated by Julian Hector


Tuesday by David Wiesner


Wednesday by Anne Bertier ; translated from the French by Claudia Z. Bedrick


Where does Thursday go? by words, Janeen Brian ; pictures, Stephen Michael King


Friday my Radio Flyer flew by Zachary Pullen

African American Month Picture Books

February is National African American History Month, and this is the first in a series of suggestions for children's reading materials. First up are picture books featuring African American characters. Several titles are distinguished by being honored with or winning the Coretta Scott King Award, which is given annually to African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values. 

Knock knock: my dad's dream for me by Daniel Beaty ; illustrated by Bryan Collier
Winner of the 2014 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award, this picture book details how a boy deals with his father's absence.

I'm not moving by written by Wiley Blevins ; illustrated by Mattia Cerato
Keesha's family is moving from the suburbs to the city, and she is worried and not happy about this turn of events.

2015 Caldecott Winner and Honor Books Announced

The American Library Association (ALA) announced the top books, video and audio books for children and young adults for 2015. The Caldecott Medal for most distinguished American picture book for children was announced, as were six Caldecott Honor Books.

2015 Caldecott Medal

The adventures of Beekle: the unimaginary friend written and illustrated by Dan Santat

2015 Caldecott Honor Books

Nana in the city written and illustrated by Lauren Castillo

The noisy paint box: the colors and sounds of Kandinsky's abstract art written by Barb Rosenstock; illustrated by Mary GrandPre

Sam & Dave dig a hole written by Mac Barnett; illustrated by Jon Klassen

Viva Frida. Spanish & English written by Yuyi Morales; photography by Tim O'Meara

Building, Construction, Demolition, etc.

Beginning in January 2015, the library will embark on phase two of a renovation project to update the building, make the library accessible to all users and to fulfill our core values of Relevance, Access, Integrity and Leadership. Phase II will include a complete renovation of the public restrooms located in the lobby with new tile and fixtures, making them ADA compliant. During this phase of the construction, patrons will be asked to use the restrooms located in the Children's Library. The Cafe will be inaccessible, as well as the main doors of the Community Room. While adults might be interested in the details of the project, kids will also have questions, and we've compiled a list of recommendations of some construction themed books.


b1547133.jpgDemolition by Sally Sutton ; illustrated by Brian Lovelock


Sometimes you have to get rid of the old to make way for the new, and that is shown here through the use of numerous sound effects. Don't forget the last page, where the machines and their jobs are identified.


Job Site by ClementJob site by Nathan Clement


Nathan Clement's brightly colored illustrations belie the dust and dirt that is usually found on a job site, but each machine has a task that's portrayed in sparse and easy to explain text.

Dress for December

Froggy%20Gets%20Dressed%20London.jpgFroggy Gets Dressed by Jonathan London is the ultimate of cold weather checklists. Excited Froggy repeatedly gets called out of the snow and back into his house by his mother because he forgot to put on an important article of warm weather gear. But there are plenty more picture books highlighting all those extra layers you need to stay warm. Here's your own checklist of corresponding books.

Hat%20by%20Brett.jpgThe Hat by Jan Brett


While Jan Brett’s The Mitten is more well-known, don’t miss this equally entertaining story. Brett’s signature illustrations relay the trouble Hedgie the hedgehog faces when he gets stuck in a discovered hat.


Mitten by Aylesworth.jpgThe Mitten by Jim Aylesworth


Jim Aylesworth’s rhyming retelling of the tale is complemented by Barbara McClintock’s expressive characters.


Duck Sock Hop by Jane Kohuth


Dance your socks off with these daring ducks as they debut their fashionable footwear.

Thorndyke Thoughts

Hey Kids,

Because of my superior location near the New Book shelves, I get first crack at the new items that come in, including the chapter books, the picture books, even nonfiction and biographies. Did you know that a biography is a book about a real person? Today I snuck a new biography about Peter Roget, the person who made Roget’s Thesaurus. Guess what? A thesaurus is not a dinosaur. It’s a list of words, and the ones that mean the same thing are all grouped together. Peter Roget always made lists of things, from when he was a very little boy, and one day those lists became his first thesaurus. 

You can even browse a version of Roget’s Thesaurus online.

The right word: Roget and his thesaurus by Jen Bryant, author ; Melissa Sweet, illustrator


Find other fascinating stories about real people in the J Biography section at the back of the Children’s Department, or ask a Children's Librarian.

 

Baseball Picture Books

Apple batter by Deborah Turney Zagwÿn


The Babe & I by written by David A. Adler ; illustrated by Terry Widener


Ballpark by Elisha Cooper


Baseball hour by Carol Nevius ; illustrated by Bill Thomson


Bats at the ballgame by written and illustrated by Brian Lies


Batter up Wombat by Helen Lester ; illustrated by Lynn Munsinger


The Berenstain bears go out for the team by Stan & Jan Berenstain

Bird Books for the Young at Heart

Parrots over Puerto Rico by Susan L. Roth and Cindy Trumbore ; collages by Susan L. Roth

Do you really want a bird? by Bridget Heos ; illustrated by Katya Longhi

Have you heard the nesting bird? by words by Rita Gray ; pictures by Kenard Pak

Mama built a little nest by Jennifer Ward ; illustrated by Steve Jenkins

For the birds: the life of Roger Tory Peterson by Peggy Thomas ; illustrated by Laura Jacques

Owls by Valerie Bodden

Picture Books

Mirette on the high wire by Emily Arnold McCully


From there to here by Laurel Croza ; pictures by Matt James


Ming's adventure with the Terracotta Army by Li Jian ; translated by Yijian Wert


Linnea in Monet's garden by text, Christina Bjork ; drawings, Lena Anderson


Green is a chile pepper: a book of colors by Roseanne Greenfield Thong ; illustrated by John Parra


Meet me at the moon by Gianna Marino